I guess it's safe to assume that those of us that want the vinyl will also have to buy the other formats to get the unreleased bits and bobs. To be honest I would rather have had the box set than having to repurchase CDs for each album to get the "new" stuff. I don't particularly want more copies of those CDs on my shelves, particularly if the mastering isn't up to snuff (read: more compressed). Also, I'm very attached to my original copies, so wouldn't get rid of them regardless.

What I'm most keen to discover is how the mastering has been done on the LPs of Afterglow and TOE. TOE may be a lost cause, not sure, but I can dream of a nice dynamic mastering. Can't sound much worse than my ATO copy, surely?

Meanwhile, my wallet is hoping that the first four album reissues don't sound as good as the original LPs!

Nothing Wrong With You posted:

If you read my post again, I said a casual buyer of vinyl.  This refers to people who aren't hardcore fans of the band who may like a single or 2.  The same people who own a greatest hits cd but none of the actual albums.  And I have worked in the music retail industry for over 25 years so I know about costs, quality, people's opinions on prices etc.  It's not as easy as just pressing it all up and hoping it sells, especially the cost of smaller vinyl runs.

 

I don't need to read your post again. You justified releasing one-disc versions on vinyl by arguing that casual buyers might only want that, but the same also applies to CD buyers. That was my point that you seem to have missed (or ignored).

So again: why would vinyl buyers perhaps only be "casual" and not CD buyers? What makes you think that someone who only has their Greatest Hits CD would want to buy one of their old albums on vinyl? Makes no sense at all. Casual purchases are either on CD or download.  The vinyl buyers are the weirdo hardcore nuts that like to fret over cartridge set up, capacitance and a whole other gamut of technical gubbins that most people gave up when "plug and play" CDs arrived. If you've worked in music retail for all those years you should know that there aren't any casual vinyl buyers any more. 

The nub of my point is: why should those who prefer to have their CH on vinyl have to either miss out on the bonus material, buy each album twice or ignore the vinyl entirely?

Last edited by Paul H
Paul H posted:

The nub of my point is: why should those who prefer to have their CH on vinyl have to either miss out on the bonus material, buy each album twice or ignore the vinyl entirely?

As I mentioned above...it's just business, dude! It's not like anyone's being punitive against vinyl consumers. Vinyl is a boutique market and re-issues of well-loved classic albums on vinyl might make good business sense...but putting out brand-new niche material (bonus tracks) on vinyl doesn't make much sense.

Last edited by slowpogo

There are people on the forum who just cannot have a sensible discussion and question my job credentials. I have been in music retail management for nearly 25 years so I KNOW how the retail industry works better than those who AREN'T in the music industry.  There ARE casual vinyl buyers around.  Oh, and apparently all the people who buy vinyl, so including forum users, are weirdos????  Some people need to calm down and stop name-calling.  This forum used to be fun.  Goodbye forum.

Last edited by Nothing Wrong With You

To be fair I don't think Paul meant 'weirdo hardcore nut' in a particularly derogatory way. I think he just meant, ya know, obsessives, completists etc.. 

Please don't leave the forum Nothing Wrong With You! Your posts are cool X

OK everybody cool down.

The main rule of the forum is mutual respect even if we disagree. Please don't make sweeping generalisations and please don't accuse people of basically anything!

And nobody needs to leave here because of one person. You can! But you don't need to.

Everybody please play nicely. Thanks.

Paul H posted:
Nothing Wrong With You posted:

If you read my post again, I said a casual buyer of vinyl.  This refers to people who aren't hardcore fans of the band who may like a single or 2.  The same people who own a greatest hits cd but none of the actual albums.  And I have worked in the music retail industry for over 25 years so I know about costs, quality, people's opinions on prices etc.  It's not as easy as just pressing it all up and hoping it sells, especially the cost of smaller vinyl runs.

 

The vinyl buyers are the weirdo hardcore nuts that like to fret over cartridge set up, capacitance and a whole other gamut of technical gubbins that most people gave up when "plug and play" CDs arrived. If you've worked in music retail for all those years you should know that there aren't any casual vinyl buyers any more. 

The nub of my point is: why should those who prefer to have their CH on vinyl have to either miss out on the bonus material, buy each album twice or ignore the vinyl entirely?

I'm casual vinyl buyer Paul

I have tonnes of vinyl accumulated over many years and a crappy turntable, As much as I would love to buy any forthcoming vinyl I'm not sure I will.  We shall see.

I was walking round Sainsburys the other day and they have a vinyl rack, I didn't see any weirdos or nuts round it, but maybe they were in the broccoli aisle?

Hi again. Let's please not make this "Casual Vinyl Buyers vs Paul." Nor should it be the defend Paul funding campaign.

I think Paul's characterisation was a bit unfair and too sharply worded. Let's please move on with the original topic and not argue if casual buyers are or are not nutty.

OK? Please? Thanks.

Ooh er. Let me just say for the record that I class myself as one of those "hardcore vinyl weirdos". Hence my frustration at the fact that the vinyl doesn't appear to feature those bonus tracks I'm so keen to hear. (Did my reference to obscure technical jargon not offer a clue? he wonders rhetorically.) The fact that my exaggerated description seems to have stolen all the headlines and obscured the point I was trying to make is disappointing. Perhaps I needed to look harder for a "tongue in cheek" emoticon.

So, having had my feeling of frustration at not being able to buy the new material on vinyl dismissed because, well, you just can't please everyone; and having my suggestion that, actually, you can if you want to, dismissed because I haven't worked in the industry for 20+ years, I appear to stand accused of taking all the fun out of this forum. And I even put a smiley at the bottom of my post to, you know, suggest that it was all said with a smile.

To paraphrase George Harrison, "I'm sorry if I hurt your Forum"  but I do feel a little put out that you choose to chastise me publicly, Deb, and not the person posting the not-so-passive-aggressive messages...

Anyways, I remain frustrated that while I'll finally be able to own the contents of Afterglow on vinyl after 17 years, it appears that there'll be a whole lot of new CD-only material coming along to take it's place.

Apologies to Nothing Wrong With You but I think that's a valid frustration. Sorry if my post was too sharply worded - it wasn't intended to cause offence - but you can't just dismiss someone's feelings by claiming to have a superior understanding of the industry. Supposed "niche market" material can and often is released on vinyl. Witness CH's very own vinyl single release of Help is Coming.

Anyways, I'm rambling now...

Last edited by Paul H
Kittybear posted:
Paul H posted:
Nothing Wrong With You posted:

If you read my post again, I said a casual buyer of vinyl.  This refers to people who aren't hardcore fans of the band who may like a single or 2.  The same people who own a greatest hits cd but none of the actual albums.  And I have worked in the music retail industry for over 25 years so I know about costs, quality, people's opinions on prices etc.  It's not as easy as just pressing it all up and hoping it sells, especially the cost of smaller vinyl runs.

 

The vinyl buyers are the weirdo hardcore nuts that like to fret over cartridge set up, capacitance and a whole other gamut of technical gubbins that most people gave up when "plug and play" CDs arrived. If you've worked in music retail for all those years you should know that there aren't any casual vinyl buyers any more. 

The nub of my point is: why should those who prefer to have their CH on vinyl have to either miss out on the bonus material, buy each album twice or ignore the vinyl entirely?

I'm casual vinyl buyer Paul

I have tonnes of vinyl accumulated over many years and a crappy turntable, As much as I would love to buy any forthcoming vinyl I'm not sure I will.  We shall see.

I was walking round Sainsburys the other day and they have a vinyl rack, I didn't see any weirdos or nuts round it, but maybe they were in the broccoli aisle?

Nice one, Kittybear. (Somehow I suspected you would be although I'm sorely tempted to ask when was the last time you casually bought a vinyl release but that isn't my point, so please don't answer that.) What IS my point is that I think casual buyers can be found amongst buyers of both records AND CDs. As can hardcore fans. So buyers of both formats ought to get treated equally: if we're pandering to the casual buyer make single-disc editions available of both the vinyl and CD editions. If we're pandering to the hardcore, make double disc editions of both formats available. S'all.

Paul, I'm calling you out because people here keep calling you out and I'm coming in late to the game. And then RIGHT after complaining that I'm calling you out, you post something trying to make Kittybear answer for something or prove something to you.

Topic closed. Want to discuss this? Try again and keep it RESPECTFUL.

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