I remembered this when Neil related the background thoughts for his song "Sinner":

I was in a day school convent in New York with the nuns until, oh my Lord, I was about 15. And when you're born in an Irish Catholic family and environment and spend your boyhood with nuns, and you're serving Mass (I was a little altar boy), you're studying the Catholic doctrine all the time with deep belief. And I think anyone who has not been a Catholic in that sort of substantial way has no realization of the ambiance of religion in which you live. It's powerful, it's potent; it's life-supporting. And it's beautiful. The Catholic religion is a poetic religion. Every month has its poetic and spiritual value. Boy, that got into me. I'm sure that my interest in mythology comes out of that.

 

I notice when I read the work of scholars or artists or novelists who are really interested in myth as a life-structuring thing -- not something that is just fantasy, but deeper, significant fantasy -- nine times out of ten they were Catholics.

 

I've been interested in what happens to people when they leave their religions. Protestants and Jews become psychologists and sociologists, and Catholics become ... poets. You know, it's really true!

(quoted from "The Hero's Journey", NAL 2004, p. 9f.)

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The adventure that we meet is the one for which we are ready. (Joseph Campbell)
Original Post
Originally Posted by Dorthonion:

I've been interested in what happens to people when they leave their religions. Protestants and Jews become psychologists and sociologists, and Catholics become ... poets. You know, it's really true!

(quoted from "The Hero's Journey", NAL 2004, p. 9f.)

My 4 brothers and I were all christened Catholic. 2 of us write poetry/lyrics. Then again so did our parents, who were raised Anglican and Dutch Reformed respectively. Dad dragged us from church to church, 

Fool, always jumping, 

Never happy where you land.

as Brian May would say. The last church my psychiatrist brother set foot in was protestant. He suffered a terrible guilt complex, due to the extreme judgementalism of that church, which he refuses to even talk about now. Guilt isn't only for Catholics! I remember my 18YO self, in the AOG church, crying too hard to speak, because I'd had a "sinful" dream.

Fitness guru/writer,  Susan Powter would joke about how, having been raised Catholic, she felt the urge to confess every 5 minutes. Tim once called himself a confessional songwriter, or words to that effect. He has certainly inspired me to be honest/blatant in my own lyrics, he and Boy George (another ex-Catholic!)

I don't know if spending my 1st 6 years as a Catholic sparked my interest in mythology, primarily Greek. My father studied ancient Greek, mostly for the original translation of The Bible, but both my parents liked the Greek myths. I learned a good deal from studying The Mythic Tarot, during my Pagan phase. I wrote quite a few Pagan songs. I particularly liked Apollo, the sun/music god, who would take away one's sorrow, if offered to him in a song. Maybe I should write one.

I did 1ce paraphrase Isaiah in a song for another singer, compared to a slew of love poetry, addressed to the Mormon man I was in love with, my true reason for "converting". I 1st attended his church on my 22nd birthday and was excommunicated on my 23rd!

15 years later, I call myself Christian, though I refuse to deny my sexuality. I don't know if I'll write any more religious songs. Falling in love can be almost identical to a religious experience, hence the sexual imagery in certain hymns. Eg:

Jesus, lover of my soul,
Let me to Thy bosom fly,
While the nearer waters roll,
While the tempest still is high.
Hide me, O my Savior, hide,
Till the storm of life is past;
Safe into the haven guide;
Oh, receive my soul at last.

Sorry about the length of this. Great topic, Dorthonion!

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